Blue Resilience UNEP recognized healthy ocean is the key to a sustainable future both for people and the planet. But, unfortunately, it is harne...

Blue Resilience UNEP recognized healthy ocean is the key to a sustainable future both for people and the planet. But, unfortunately, it is harne...

Blue Resilience UNEP recognized healthy ocean is the key to a sustainable future both for people and the planet. But, unfortunately, it is harnessing its resources of our oceans and coasts reflected in jeopardizing livelihoods and the capacity for disaster risk reduction and endangering marine biodiversity. The more obvious things are overfishing, pollution, coastal development and climate changes.The emerging sustainable ocean-based economic scenario, social and environmental benefits within the planetary boundaries of oceans and coasts by engaging with countries, regional seas and many partners, seeks to enhance decision-making, enabling conditions and capacities to develop and implement sustainable, climate-resilient and inclusive blue economy policies, strategies and solutions that reduce human impacts and support the sound use of marine and coastal ecosystems and their many services. However, countries are dependent on the sea and its resources and the opportunities it holds for the economy, food and well-being of their population and is determined to support a healthy and thriving fishing industry based on fair competition and the sustainable use of the ocean. Particularly vulnerability of small island, developing states and other large ocean nations of the impact of transnational organized crime in the global fishing industry. The crimes committed through the whole fisheries supply and value chain include illegal fishing, corruption, tax and customs fraud, money laundering, embezzlement, document fraud and human trafficking.The emergence of Blue Resilience facilitates a knowledge-based learning package towards improved cooperation between agencies such as fisheries, tax, labour, and the police in developing countries to address these fisheries crime more effectively. It is launched on 16 September 2020 and cooperates with the Blue Justice Initiative via the Norwegian Ministry of Trade, Industry and Fisheries.The Blue Justice Initiative (BJI) theory is best achieved through close dialogue with – and invested involvement by – the affected countries seeking solutions. The BJI aims to attain an integrated understanding of the problems in this field, including their complexity and diversity, and the multifaceted solutions needed to address them at all levels, that is, nationally, regionally and internationally. The Blue Justice Initiative advances the implementation of the Copenhagen Declaration by supporting developing countries to improve their capacity to devise and implement measures to deter and counter transnational organized fisheries crime. The global community has set ambitious targets in the Agenda for the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals to end poverty and hunger, protect life below water, promote decent work for all and promote peace, justice and strong institutions. Unfortunately, transnational organized crime in the global fishing industry undermine the SDGs, and Blue Justice Initiative aims to operationalize the tools needed to address this problem. It is committed to fulfilling the UN Sustainable Development Goals, particularly with Goal 14 on “Life Below Water” and Goal 16 on “Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions.”To consolidate, UNEP’s ‘Sustainable Blue Economy Initiative’ aims to facilitate sustainable ocean-based economic, social and environmental benefits within the planetary boundaries of oceans and coasts. Engaging with countries, Regional Seas and many partners, it seeks to enhance decision-making, enabling conditions and capacities to develop and implement sustainable, climate-resilient and inclusive blue economy policies, strategies and solutions that reduce human impacts and support the sound use of marine and coastal ecosystems and their many services.A Sustainable Blue Economy Decision Support & Enabling Framework and learning platform are under development to help guide:• Mapping, assessment and valuation of marine and coastal ecosystems and their services• Circular and resource-efficient economic policy pathways and pollution reduction strategies• Governance and management for optimal use of ocean space and resources• Sustainable Blue Economy financing principles• Capacity building and translation of know-how into actionThe current partners of this policy are Benin, Chile, Costa Rica, Faroe Islands, Fiji, Ghana, Greenland, Honduras, Iceland, Indonesia, Kiribati, Liberia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nicaragua, Norway, Palau, Panama, Philippines, São Tomè and Principe, Scotland, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Timor Leste and Uruguay. For further reading at UNEP web site titled “Enabling sustainable, resilient and inclusive blue economies" & Blue Justice websites. The gross root of the problem lay with fishery resource depletion by overfishing and ignored the ground reality of fish fecundity (eggs, larvae) loss by the seawater utilizing industries like power plants, desalination plants & chloralkali industries etc. The underdeveloped filtration technology of these industrial sector kills unknowingly kills the planktonic forms of eggs & larvae of many marine forms by the fact entrainment & impingement. Recorded a coastal power plant impact through scientific study and published a research paper—suggested subsurface intake systems\beach well technology by utilizing natural filtration capacity. Relevant links for research papers as evidence and needs to be considered under Blue Justice Initiatives.Marine Pollution Bulletin link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0025326X18303825?via%3DihubScience link: https://science.sciencemag.org/content/361/6400/376.1#:~:text=Beach%2Dfiltered%20intake%20systems%20could,plant%20draws%20on%20aquatic%20ecosystems.&text=Coastal%20power%20stations%20regularly%20draw,returned%20to%20the%20marine%20environment.ESPR link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11356-020-10839-4